Home » Provincial Offences » Provincial Offences: Serving the Public

Provincial Offences: Serving the Public

print friendly

General Information

General information about tickets and fines can be found on the Ministry of the Attorney General’s website.

Many relatively minor offences that are prosecuted under Part I or Part II of the Provincial Offences Act can be settled out of court by payment of the amount written on the offence notice (ticket).   Section 8 of the Act provides that this amount is made up of the set fine for the offence, costs and applicable victim fine surcharge.

Set fines are established by the Chief Justice of the Ontario Court of Justice pursuant to the definition of set fine in s. 1 of the Provincial Offences Act.  The set fines can be found on the Ontario Courts website at How Do I Learn about Set Fines?.  Short-form wordings for these offences to be used on the offence notice are established by R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 950 for Part I offences and by R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 949.

Costs are established by R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 945.

Victim fine surcharges are established by O. Reg. 161/00.

The Guide for Defendants in Provincial Offences Cases will provide defendants with general information about the court process for provincial offences cases.

Legislation, Court Rules and Practices

The key piece of legislation is the Provincial Offences Act. See also, Provincial Offences Act Rules and Regulations

Find a Municipal Courthouse

Municipal court locations are posted on the Ministry of the Attorney General’s website.

Language Rights

  • French language rights: A defendant whose language is French who is charged under provincial legislation is entitled to a bilingual trial. If charged under federal legislation, he or she has the right to a French trial. For more information on French language rights, please consult the Ministry of the Attorney General’s French Language Services website and the publication, Justice in Both Languages.
  • Other languages: Any accused person and witness in a provincial offences matter who does not understand or speak the language in which the proceedings are conducted or who is deaf has the right to the assistance of an interpreter. For more information about requesting an interpreter, please see the Ministry of the Attorney General’s website.

This post is also available in: French